community-based, non-corporate, participatory media

About Contact Us Policies Mailing Lists Radio Video Publish! Calendar Search

pittsburgh: more on Nagasaki day at CMU's Software Engineering Institute
by blast furnace radio / vincent scotti eirene Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2008 at 12:54 AM

reflection and symbolic action on Nagasaki day at CMU's SEI photo from pittsburgh imc

download PDF (363.5 kibibytes)



Water pouring at CMU's Military outlet,August 9th, Nagasaki day symbolizing the lack of clean water in Iraq because of the wars and sanctions since August 2 1990, the police threatened arrest but never kept there promise.


video clip forth coming...


article
http://pittsburgh.indymedia.org/news/2008/08/29820.php


photo
http://media.indypgh.org/uploads/2008/08/the-cleaners.jpg


mp3
A profoundly moving and haunting threnody for the victims of Hiroshima composed by K. Penderedki
info. http://www.encyclopedia.com/doc/1G2-3404705037.html
mp3 location http://radio4all.net/responder.php/download/28772/33346/48934/?url=http://www.radio4all.net:8080/files/ href="mailto:vincenteirene@gmail.com">vincenteirene@gmail.com/722-1-nagasaki.mp3



leaflet - from Fallujah to Nagasaki

testimony a Hibakusha
three days later on August 9th, 1945 at precisely 11:02 in the morning - a second Bomb was exploded over the city of Nagasaki. The Japanese called it pikadon (flash-boom). There was a blinding flash of light brighter than the sun, followed by a tremendous shock wave and a searing blast of heat. Huge poisonous mushroom clouds ascended into the sky and a deadly radioactive black rain fell. Those at the center of the blasts were incinerated, leaving only their shadows behind.


testimony by a U.S. soldier In Fallujah I saw the burnt bodies of women and children ... The Thite Phosphorus explodes and forms a cloud who's in 150 meters is dead. A whole city was siezed and razed to the earth using this kinf of bombing.


iraq / water leaflet

In Iraq 70 Percent of People Lack Clean Water

Posted by Abigail Brown, Water For The Ages at 12:00 PM on May 1, 2008. / from alternet.org



The number of civilians in Iraq without water has risen from 50 percent to 70 percent during 2003 to 2007.



Less than half of Iraq's population of 29 million people have access to clean, drinkable water. And, according to a recent report by Oxfam, the number of civilians in Iraq without water has risen from 50 percent to 70 percent during 2003 to 2007 (the continued US occupation).

Recent History of Water in Iraq

In the recent past, Iraq had over 140 drinking water and treatment facilities in operation. Air attacks in 1991, during the Persian Gulf War destroyed many of these water treatment plants.

At the same time, UN imposed sanctions disallowed trade between Iraq and other countries. This made import of needed chemicals and supplies for upkeep of the water treatment facilities difficult.

By 2003, Iraq's 140 major water treatment facilities were operating at about 35 percent of their design capacity. In March 2003, the US government launched a direct-attack on Iraq. This continued war, for over five-years now, has rendered useless the already deteriorating water infrastructure systems across the country.

Years of political upheaval, sanctions against Iraq, consistent mortar attacks, and unstable-transitional governing bodies have made maintenance of the water treatment systems almost impossible.



Over 600 workers from the Ministry of Municipalities and Public Works have been killed attempting to repair these networks since 2005. -- UNICEF



Unsafe water is also taking its toll. Iraq saw the worst outbreak of Cholera in recorded history in 2007.

photo of water action
by blast furnace radio / vincent scotti eirene Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2008 at 12:54 AM

photo of water actio...
the-cleaners.jpgemfpjw.jpg, image/jpeg, 504x323

by pitt imc

mp3 music for hiroshima
by blast furnace radio / vincent scotti eirene Tuesday, Aug. 19, 2008 at 12:54 AM

audio: wav file (52.5 mebibytes)audio: wav file (52.5 mebibytes)

ten minutes

© 2001-2009 Pittsburgh Independent Media Center. Unless otherwise stated by the author, all content is free for non-commercial reuse, reprint, and rebroadcast, on the net and elsewhere. Opinions are those of the contributors and are not endorsed by the Pittsburgh Independent Media Center.
Disclaimer | Privacy