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Global Nonviolent Resistance Marks Third Anniversary
by Danny Målec Tuesday, Mar. 21, 2006 at 12:44 PM

Marking the third anniversary of the U.S. occupation of Iraq, thousands of activists from all parts of the globe engaged in nonviolent demonstrations and direct action focusing on disrupting business as usual at some of the symbolic “Pillars of the War in Iraq” – US government installations, military bases, congressional offices, recruitment centers and war profiteers. Actions took place in cities around the world, including Atlanta, Belfast, Boston, Buenos Aires, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, Madrid, Managua, New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Rome, San Francisco, San Salvador and Washington, DC. These actions demonstrate increasing boldness to challenge the mechanisms of the war in Iraq through coordinated, global nonviolent resistance.

Nonviolent resistance actions were called for by many groups, including the Global Call Iraq Campaign and National Campaign for Nonviolent Resistance, and were organized by small groups and communities around the world. Addressing a group of resisters outside of the U.S. consulate in Belfast, Mairead Maguire, a Nobel Peace Laureate and one of the signers of Global Call Iraq, stated, “On this the 3rd anniversary of the invasion and occupation of Iraq we gather together to remember all those who have been killed, and to call for an end to the US led invasion and occupation. We call also for people to continue to mobilize and use nonviolent resistance to end the occupation of Iraq.”

Nonviolent activists from around the world have heeded the call and are committed to intensifying the nonviolent struggle to end the Iraq occupation throughout this year. One of the Global Call Coordinators is Jesuit priest Joe Mulligan, who was among the 51 arrested at the Pentagon; he stated, “This show of global nonviolent resistance to U.S. policy of aggression and domination is only just beginning. Peacemakers and nonviolent activist groups around the world are gathering strength and mobilizing toward greater action and more strategic nonviolent resistance to end this war.”

Thousands gathered in New Orleans on Sunday for an anti-war demonstration and to welcome those that had marched over five days from Mobile to New Orleans. The march was organized by several groups, including Veterans for Peace and Military Families Speak Out. Mike McGuire, Global Call Iraq organizer, helped organize the march and commented, “As the U.S. continues to drop bombs over Iraq, those bombs also explode over New Orleans. While the U.S. government spends close to $300 billion on overseas wars, cities throughout the gulf coast have yet to recover from Hurricane Katrina and the majority are struggling just to survive.” McGuire noted the overwhelming hospitality and support of the southern communities for the march and saw it as a significant sign of hope for this country.

The Global Call Iraq Campaign, led by Nobel Laureates, Religious Leaders and Nonviolent Activists from around the world, is calling for ongoing massive nonviolent resistance throughout this year. The next date of resistance is set for May 1, which is the International Day of the Worker. May 1st is proposed for global nonviolent resistance to highlight the reality that in this war -- like all wars -- the brunt of the cost (both economic and human) is disproportionately felt by the poor and working classes all over the world. Learn more about the Global Call Iraq campaign at http://www.globalcalliraq.org.

Global Call Iraq
Contact: Danny Malec, 860-591-4009
Voluntown, CT, USA
press@globalcalliraq.org
March 21, 2006



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